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The cheapest way to heat your home with renewable energy

By Green architecture, News, Reduce heating & cooling costs
Households are turning to sustainability Step by step, householders are making economic decisions that will eventually lead to many completely disconnecting from the gas grid, as they find gas to be an increasingly costly secondary source of home energy. This is particularly true when it comes to space-heating. When the cost of operating a modern reverse cycle air conditioner (known in Tasmania and elsewhere around the world as a heat pump) can be one-third the cost of heating with gas, why wouldn’t a householder have a look at the possibilities?Another attraction is that heating with a reverse cycle air conditioner is largely renewable. Our research has quantified that reverse cycle air conditioners in Australia recover more renewable energy than do all of the millions of rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. Who knew?
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The battery revolution is exciting, but remember they pollute too

By Green architecture, News, Reduce heating & cooling costs
Transitioning battery technologies for a greener economy We have also seen the development of an aluminium-ion battery that may be safer, lighter and cheaper than the lithium-ion batteries used by Tesla and most other auto and technology companies. These advances are exciting for two main reasons. First, the cost of energy storage, in the form of batteries, is decreasing significantly. This makes electric vehicle ownership and home energy storage much more attainable. The second, related reason is that these cheaper green technologies may make the transition to a greener economy easier and faster than we have so far imagined (although, as has been recently pointed out on The Conversation, these technologies are only one piece of the overall energy puzzle). Beware the industrial option These technological advances, and much of the excitement around them, lend themselves to the idea that solving environmental problems such as climate change is primarily a case of technological adjustment. But this approach encourages a strategy of “superindustrialisation”, in which technology and industry are brought to bear to resolve climate change, through resource efficiency, waste reduction and pollution control. In this context, the green economy is presented as an inevitable green technological economic wave.
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The cheapest way to heat your home with renewable energy – just flick a switch

By News
The cheapest way to heat your home with renewable energy – just flick a switch Gas bill got you feeling grey? A reverse cycle air conditioner could save you money.  A few years ago, similar to views about future electricity demand, forecasters thought gas demand in Australia would keep rising. As it turns out, gas demand peaked in 2012 and may halve by 2025 - as we showed in our recently published University of Melbourne Energy Institute (MEI) report, and earlier on The Conversation. Step by step, householders are making economic decisions that will eventually lead to many completely disconnecting from the gas grid, as they find gas to be an increasingly costly secondary source of home energy. This is particularly true when it comes to space-heating. When the cost of operating a modern reverse cycle air conditioner (known in Tasmania and elsewhere around the world as a heat pump) can be one-third the cost of heating with gas, why wouldn’t a householder have a look at the possibilities?
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Canberra’s Rock Wall House Listed as 2014 Finalist

By News
Caladenia Street House by Strine Environments The Caladenia Street House was designed in response to climate change effects, including increased temperatures and frequency of heat wave conditions, but deals with these impacts differently from the typical installation and use of air conditioning units. Key initiatives: Correct orientation to suit the micro-climate of the site Ultra Mass Walls and slab with high insulation and thermal isolation. Walls fabricated offsite to reduce waste and increase sustainability. Double glazing High windows for release of warm air in summer We are listed in the Single Dwelling category of the 2014 BPN Sustainability Awards. Our highly insulated thermal house with northern glazing that disappears into the landscape Based on the timeless Millennium Design, this beautiful house uses our highly insulated Thermal Panels, slab, northern glazing and fans to achieve minimal heating and no cooling is necessary. As the planting matures the house will disappear into the landscape. Rock Wall House in Relax Magazine The Canberra Times recently published a great article on the ‘Rock Wall House’.
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Canberra’s Rock Wall House sets energy-efficient standard

By News
Achieving the most energy efficient design possible For architect Ric Butt, the design was all about how to use the block, achieve the most energy efficient design possible and how the garden could be experienced from every room in the house. From his first visit, Ric could see that there was an opportunity to establish a connection between the front entry and the view through to the rear northern garden. The angled design provided two triangular spaces, a cool southern one for summer and a warm northern one for winter. Our highly insulated thermal house with northern glazing that disappears into the landscape Based on the timeless Millennium Design, this beautiful house uses our highly insulated Thermal Panels, slab, northern glazing and fans to achieve minimal heating and no cooling is necessary. As the planting matures the house will disappear into the landscape. Rock Wall House in Relax Magazine The Canberra Times recently published a great article on the ‘Rock Wall House’.
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Solstice House Opening

By News
Media Release: Strine Environments to reveal new Solstice House design in time for the Winter Solstice Strine Environments, the leading sustainable design and construction company, will on Sunday 21 June reveal its newest design, Solstice House, to coincide with the 2015 Winter Solstice. Located in Arndell Street in the Canberra suburb of Macquarie, the Solstice House is an architecturally-designed sustainable living solution and ideal for those looking to downsize or make use of limited land or budget. The ACT Planning Minister, Mick Gentleman MLA, will officially declare the house open at 12 noon. The house integrates design excellence with sustainability, using precast concrete and environmental construction as the lucore element of the building process and as a result, lowers the running and maintenance cost for occupiers compared with a standard home. Using the principles of passive solar design, as well as a range of unique products and techniques, Strine homes maintain an average of 22˚C all year round – eliminating the need for excessive and costly heating and cooling usage. Ric Butt, Principal Architect and Director of Strine Environments, has pioneered environmental sustainability practice in design and construction in Australia and says it is now easier for Australians to live comfortably in extreme weather climates. “The passive solar design used in the construction of our homes virtually eliminates the need for heating and cooling within the building. We achieve this by using thermal mass, such as concrete walls and floors, and…
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